What Next?

A verdict in the second trial of Yury DMITRIEV is expected at the end of February. The prosecution and defence are currently summing up.

In April 2018, to the amazement of many, Dmitriev was acquitted of all the more serious charges. This time no one is hazarding a guess as to the outcome. Public interest within Russia remains high. If 4,000 signed a petition in the historian’s support during the first trial, over 10,000 have done so this time round.

Whatever the outcome it seems safe to predict that the losing side will appeal against the verdict to a higher court which, in this case, is the Supreme Court of the Karelian Republic. Waiting for that hearing will take us to early summer — and beyond, if the court of higher instance again supports conviction and prompts another wave of popular indignation.

For the time being, Yury Dmitriev remains in Petrozavodsk, in Detention Centre No 1, where he has been held since June 2018 and where he will stay until the Supreme Court issues its ruling. He has not yet vanished for years into a penal colony like his unfortunate colleague Sergei Koltyrin.

“The time is short,” wrote the poet, “but the waiting is long.”

JC

Imprisoned for memorialising Sandormokh, refusing to forget the Great Terror

Halya Coynash

Russian historian Yury DMITRIEV turned 64 on 28 January 2020. It was his third birthday detained on charges that bear no scrutiny, and his arrest coincided with the beginnings of a campaign to rewrite the history of one of the darkest pages of the Soviet Terror – the mass killing by quota of Russians, Ukrainians and other prisoners of the Solovetsky Archipelago at the Sandormokh Clearing in Karelia in 1937.

Yury Dmitriev after his acquittal in April 2018,
The stone at the entrance to the Sandormokh memorial complex

If the current regime in Russia was hoping to silence Dmitriev, it has failed. The historian and head of the Karelian branch of the Memorial Society has just published a book entitled Sandarmokh: A Place of Memory, providing information about both the victims and the perpetrators of the mass executions in the forest. In a recent letter, Dmitriev wrote that

“it is memory that makes human beings human, and not a part of the population. […] While I’m alive, I won’t allow them to rewrite our common history. […] The attempt to rewrite the history of Sandarmokh is part of the strategy of the current regime, an attempt to return our country to a camp “surrounded by enemies”. The aim is to retain their power. A frightened population will always seek protection from a strong leader”.

In a preface to the book, Dmitriev repeats this central theme about the pivotal role of memory. He points out that, while Sandarmokh is a place of memory, for him it is also a place of education where people cease to be a faceless population and are transformed into a nation, conscious of their shared fate.

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A verdict next month

YURY DMITRIEV’s lawyer expects a verdict in his second trial at the end of February 2020. The prosecution and defence are currently giving their final statements.

The present trial began in October 2018 and has proceeded even more slowly than the first. Less is known about what has been going on behind closed doors at the second trial, also held in camera. One strategy pursued by Victor Anufriev, the defence attorney, has stressed his client’s high reputation among academics, rights activists and other professionals, for example, Anatoly Razumov of the National Library in St Petersburg. They have testified in his defence. In November 2019 a petition in English (and Italian) was circulated among academics overseas and the resulting list of signatories was presented as evidence in court.

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