Sergei Koltyrin has died

The former director of the Medvezhegorsk City Museum, Sergei KOLTYRIN, died yesterday in the town’s prison hospital. His brother Vladimir passed the news to the Sever.Realii website.

“He died last night,” said Koltyrin’s brother. “He had cancer. That’s all I can tell you. He wasn’t in the ordinary hospital but the other one and, as they told me, it’s not exactly the place you’d send children on vacation. They’ll write what they like in his death certificate.”

The republican department of the Investigative Committee confirmed the news of the historian’s death. As soon as they receive the papers from the Federal Penitentiary Service, they commented, they will begin to check what happened.

Radio Liberty, 2 April 2020 (in Russian)

In May 2019, Sergei Koltyrin was sentenced to nine years’ imprisonment in a corrective labour colony. For other news items and reports on this site about his case — https://dmitrievaffair.com/tag/sergei-koltyrin/

A glimpse of Dmitriev

The hearing took place today, despite quarantine measures announced in connection with the Covid-19 outbreak.

Yury DMITRIEV in corridor of Petrozavodsk City Courthouse, 23 March 2020

Supporters caught a glimpse of Yury Dmitriev as he was escorted along the corridor. To judge by his appearance, he had recovered from his sickness. “He looked well and had put on weight,” Anatoly RAZUMOV told the Petersburg Human Rights Council over the phone from Petrozavodsk.

Dmitriev was glad that the new edition of his book, Sandarmokh, a Place of Remembrance, was being acquired by libraries in Russia, and sent greetings to all concerned about his situation.

The next court hearing has been scheduled for Tuesday, 14 April. As usual, today’s hearing took place behind closed doors. Dmitriev’s detention in custody was prolonged today until 28 June.

“Unsolved Mysteries”, A Review

The second front in the Dmitriev Affair

Even before Yury DMITRIEV was arrested in December 2016, an alternative explanation of the mass burials at Sandormokh had appeared (see below, Appendix).

Promoted by two historians at Petrozavodsk University, Sergei Verigin and Yury Kilin, it suggested that among those executed and buried in the forest near Medvezhegorsk were not only victims of Stalin’s Great Terror (1937-1938) but also Red Army soldiers shot by the Finns during the Continuation War (1941-1944).

Recent books about Sandarmokh by Yury Dmitriev and Sergei Verigin

Late last year a slender 86-page volume (with illustrations) by Professor Verigin and fellow author Armas Mashin appeared. Entitled The Mysteries of Sandarmokh: Part One, What lies Hidden in the Wooded Glade, it was published by the controversial Finnish author Johan Backman.

In a review on 27 February 2020 on the Karelia News website, Irina TAKALA of the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Karelian Centre discusses this brochure as a piece of historical research, and assesses its contribution to the ongoing debate about the past reality and current meaning of the Sandarmokh killing fields.

Continue reading

The Progress of the Trial: February 2020

“By 10 February, the prosecution planned, the final words by both sides would have come to an end and a verdict would be delivered,” says Anatoly RAZUMOV, a friend of Yury Dmitriev’s and a member of St Petersburg’s Human Rights Council. “However, the defence had prepared two speakers for that day.

Anatoly Ya. RAZUMOV, National Library, St Petersburg

“In the early 2000s, Professor Victor Kirillov, D.Phil. (History), was in charge of the creation of a unified database of the victims of political repression, the Their Names Restored project [see below]. He arrived by plane having travelled from Yekaterinburg in the Urals via Petersburg in order to testify on behalf of his friend Yury Dmitriev. Now even the President of Russia was suggesting that such a database be created, Kirillov said: a popular initiative was becoming a task for the State. The trial is closed and we can judge what is going on merely by the length of hearing. Victor testified for 40-50 minutes.

“Then the court heard a specialist in children’s issues. She spoke and was questioned the rest of the day, from morning until lunchtime, and after lunch until 5.00 pm. Seemingly, her testimony and explanations impressed the court.

Continue reading

Next court hearing, 23 March

Due to illness — Yury DMITRIEV had a high temperature — the scheduled hearing on Thursday, 20 February, did not take place. The Petrozavodsk City Court will next assemble to hear the case in a month’s time, on Monday 23 March.

Andrei Oborin,
Dmitriev Supporters’ Page, Facebook